The Never Ending Jou...

Guest Blog by Grant Faulkner Did I choose my writing process, or did it choose me? This was the question I asked myself after 20+ years of writing fiction. I wondered if I’d stumbled thoughtlessly upon my creative practice, and instead of actively scrutinizing it or consciously constructing...

Mastering Conflict a...

Mickey Spillane once said, “The first line sells your book. The last line sells your next book.” But how do you bridge the gap between those two lines? How do you get readers from Point A to Point Z without them giving up around Point F? (F as in Failed your job as a writer to engage the...

Read and Write to Co...

Have you ever turned to a page of a book and read something that seemed to speak directly to you? Sometimes we come across the words of another that articulate our own thoughts, feelings, passions and struggles.  To see another person ― either an author or a fictional character ― going...

Windowpane Writing

There are many ways to assess the quality of one’s writing. “Good writing” can mean many different things to many different people, but let’s take a look at what the great George Orwell has to say on the matter: “Good writing is like a windowpane.” —...

Earning the Mark of Quality: James Genco’s Nonfict...

Here at Abbott Press, we’re happy to announce our fourth title to receive the prestigious Writer’s Digest’s Mark of Quality distinction. Congratulations to avid historian and author James Genco and his book “Into the Tornado of War.” About the Book “Into the Tornado of War” is a thrilling nonfiction work that chronicles the Civil War through the eyes of a group of volunteer soldiers from western Michigan who join the battle against the Confederacy in America’s most brutal and bloody war. Genco draws from hundreds of letters, diaries and memoirs to piece together the dramatic story of the Twenty-First Michigan Volunteer...

Develop the Critic Within

Criticism about your writing is going to come in many forms. Someone you don’t know may write a review of your book in a newspaper. Someone you trust might offer a critique of your draft. You might get feedback from a writing group or read comments online at Amazon or Goodreads. Despite whether the criticism is constructive or destructive (and there’s a major difference), it is important to take all of it into consideration before throwing away as much of it as you wish. First off, most feedback you get from friends will be over-complimentary, so you have to take their “This is amazing!” comments with a grain of salt. These blanket...

Can you make “believers” out of potential readers? Sep11

Can you make “...

What do we mean by the line above? Why “believers?” If you’re a writer of nonfiction, writing well simply isn’t enough to get people to buy your book. Nonfiction requires authors with deep knowledge of their subject matter, an authoritative voice, and unquestionable credentials. Do...